Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Don't talk to me

I love my new job. I know I've gone on and on about it here on the blog, but I'm just so thankful for it and how much better my life is now that I'm done with retail work. I remember how fortunate I am every single day.

With all that being said, I do have one teeny-tiny little complaint. It's the only thing about the job that bothers me at all, and it's kind of silly: I get really tired of talking to people nonstop all day long. It's draining.

The phone lines ring dozens and dozens of times a day, and I probably answer 75% of the time. Parents are constantly signing their kids out and in, and each time a student is signed out I have to check the adult's ID, then check the child's "permission card" to make sure they're an approved person to release them to, then look up which class the child is in and call in there to get him/her.

Teachers come through on their planning periods needing this or that, along with social workers, psychologists, therapists, volunteers, substitutes....it's never ending. I'm at the big desk right there in the midst of it all, the first point of contact for everyone. The school has almost 1000 students, and probably 150 total staff members, so you can imagine what that entails. I talk to people all. Day. Long. It gets to be mentally exhausting sometimes.

When I leave work in the afternoon, I don't feel like having a conversation with anyone. For any reason.






I want to sit quietly somewhere and read, or watch tv, preferably with a glass of wine or a mixed drink.  And a good brisk walk with the dogs before supper helps, too. After spending all day in an office I need the exercise as much as they do, and they don't care if I don't say much.


24 comments:

  1. I know you love your job and I am so glad you have it, but yes! Talking to human beings all day long has to be incredibly taxing and tiring. You may need one of those silent retreats once a year or something to recharge and renew yourself.
    In the meantime, it sounds like you're doing exactly what you need to do.

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  2. As a teacher, my days were filled with human interaction - so much interaction that from time to time I had my fill of it and just wanted solitude and peace. Perhaps that is partly why I relish my solitary country walks these days - with nobody bothering me.

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    1. By the way, I think you should share your feelings with your line manager. Perhaps an hour of quiet administration time could be factored into your work schedule each day with a colleague taking over your role for a short while.

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  3. Oh My Goodness !
    I can understand what you are talking about.
    Hopefully by next year it will be somewhat better.
    Walks are always a good thing.

    cheers, parsnip

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  4. I work with elderly and vulnerable people all day long. I come home and I have nothing left to give.

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  5. One thousand students! That's a big school. Constant interaction is draining. Perhaps a flask with a little something hidden in a drawer would help . . . you to lose your job.

    Love,
    Janie

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  7. I always taught in private schools where there was very little wastage of cash. No administrators, therapists, psychoanalysts, or social workers; just a handful of dedicated hard-working teachers, and a few hundred well behaved children. I can understand your work-load, you must be dealing with all those expensive unnecessary extras that some schools manage perfectly happily without.

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    1. And no doubt they moan that they are under funded!

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  8. I love the cartoon! I can totally understand your need for a bit of peace and quiet after your working day. So pleased that you are enjoying your new job though, I bet the day goes quicker.

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  9. My work has always involved talking to lots of people all day long, either in person (at the library) or on the phone (at the two jobs I had after that). Now, I have a good balance between meetings, phone calls and other situations where and when I talk to people, and silent work at my desk, writing, doing research and so on.
    I know exactly how draining it was when I would have around 80 phone calls every day - those were the ones coming in, plus the ones I made, plus my colleagues talking either to me, or each other, or customers... all in one big open-plan office.

    Walks are just perfect for relaxing your mind and giving your body the exercise it misses when you have to sit at a desk all day. Like YP, I think it is partly my work history that makes me love walking and hiking so much - preferably on my own or with just one other person for company, such as O.K. or my sister.

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  10. I know what you are talking about, i felt the same in my working years, now that i am not working i like the silent so much.

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  11. I completely understand. I used to work as a bank cashier ( teller I think you might call it? ) On a busy day the customers just kept coming and coming ! " Sorry to keep you waiting...blah blah blah blah.....is there anything else I can help you with? " If we didn't say the first and last it was a hanging offence.( even if the customer had just walked in the door and straight up to the till! ).

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  12. I know the feeling. I had a job where I spent much of my day talking; I would often come home and just and stare out a window... in silence.

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  13. I can understand that. When I worked, I often came home not wanting to answer or talk on the phone.

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  14. I had a rule. Don't talk to mom while she goes in the bedroom, closes the door and changes clothes. This was long, long ago, in the days of pantyhose. It was fifteen minutes of peace, to regroup, before I heard their day. Go change you clothes when you come home; be open to the peace.

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  15. OMG! I get it! This is my life exactly. Even though I'm in a library, being at the front desk puts me in "conversation range" for every single person who walks in or out.

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  16. Summers are busiest for talkative customers here. I,too, get tired of talking all day and need severe downtime when I get away.

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  17. I can very much relate to how tiring lots (an overload) of important conversations can be. My career choice as a librarian cataloger, behind the scenes, was helpful with that. Ah reading, a glass of wine, an understanding spouse and a dog or cat: all good.

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